Near Future Predicted in 1990 – AT&T You Will

Remember the AT&T “You Will” campaign from the 90s? 

It is the one that everyone got upset about because AT&T expected us to send faxes from the beach.

The ads also promised such radical things as getting directions from an in-car GPS, buying concert tickets from a cash machine, and tucking your baby in via video call.  Perhaps we need to recognize near future fiction can come true.  Whether or not AT&T is the company bringing it us is another question.  And then there is Tom Selleck.

AT&T 1993 “You Will” AdsTechnorati Tags: , ,

Interactive Storytelling

Just listened to an interesting Guardian tech podcast about interactive fiction or online storytelling.

Wired editor Frank Rose has written a book called The Art of Immersion.  Whether it is classics like the way Lost built such a convoluted story that fans were driven online to discuss it, or how Mad Men fans built twitter characters like Betty Draper.  But both of these are extensions of a serial (or somewhat serial in the case of Lost) traditional series.

More interesting to me are the experiments that change the fundamental base story.  This means not taking a series online like The Spot (1995-97), but more stories that are part generated by an online community.  

Online Caroline (2000) – Early experiment using database-driven, templated responses to a video story.  Although the site is down, there is a lot of commentary still online.

Such Tweet Sorrow
(2011) – Great British remake of Romeo & Juliet set in modern day UK, but told through twitter over about a month.  Because the characters are in a public forum, fans were able to riff off story lines and engage directly with the characters.

Frank – Art of Immersion

Cream Cheese? Real Women of Philadelphia

This case study grabbed my attention from Fast Company and then ClickZ.  The promotion is fairly common for a user-gernated competition to get people excited about recipes involving a specific product, but what is less amazing are the results.

The Promotion

8 Month Campaign

Paula Deen celebrity Food Network Star

Launch video had celeb request recipes

2 winners from each week compete in final showdown

winners host next season’s competition

YouTube takeover on launch day


Results

Launch video seen by 51m people

10m watched the entire video

100k clicked through (1%)

25m recipe views

691,241 visitors who spend an average of 4:28 on the site. There are 4,373 registrants on the site.

Philly’s sales up 5%

User Generated Campaigns – The New Black?

It is great to see the number of campaigns out there asking us to upload videos, tell stories and work our creative muscles.   Just as no one is surprised by a “buy one get one free” offer or the fact that brands use the “big launch premiere” tactic to get buzz. 

This is one of the great new tools marketers have to work with now that everyone has the internet. 

The question is what does the brand do with the content.  Just as direct marketers have collected a host of data with emails for years and then only send out mass shotgun messages afterwards, the challenge will be whether Dunkin or Toyota or Amex can really put the content to good use. 

If “America runs on Dunkin'” and 10,000 people create videos of impassioned, stark raving caffeinated testimonials of why they run on Dunkin’, it shouldn’t be too much work to see a nice digitally fed national campaign hit TV.

America’s Funniest Videos is in its 20th year (not counting 40+ years of Candid Camera before it).  I think we can trust there is appetite.



Stat Attack – Conversion on Selected Advertising

Innovative media always tends to have higher click-through rates when it first launches.  E-Mail and banners dropped from 2% to .02% response rates.  Remember when a fax guaranteed being placed on a business person’s desk?  Maybe not, but regardless it isn’t surprising, people are curious creatures. 

But there might be a bigger story here — basically one of how good targeting, good media choice and giving people the choice to watch make a big difference.  The case study below is for Porsche on Xbox360.  The panel with the click here is “interruptive” but the full ad is chosen. Another is Honda’s eco-charity campaign for the Honda Insight delivered on mobile.  Again, a small banner leading to a large ad.  It saw a click-through rate on mobile of 27%.

Kinect, the Xbox 360 controller-free add on, hits U.S. stores Nov. 4, followed by the United Kingdom the following week. Advertisers are attracted to the 24 million Xbox 360 members worldwide.  On average, Microsoft sees between 3% and 9% click-through rates (CTRs) on campaigns, Alexander says. “We recently did a campaign with Porsche where they chose to launch the Panamera, and they saw a 6% click-through rate on their campaign. According to their own internal metrics, about 20% of those who explored the experience on Xbox Live went into a dealership.” MediaPostNews 28 September 2010

Are you aware what business you are in? Lessons from Yahoo!

The story of Yahoo is an amazing story of the Internet and how quickly it moves and how ruthless it really is. 

I had lunch with Lewis Gersh the other day and we talked about the big ones — AOL, MySpace — but also the long list of others — GeoCities, Excite, Altavista, LetsBuyIt, Interworld, Netscape, The Globe, QXL — that crossed industries and have all disappeared.  The question of why is of course different for each one, but here is a very insightful post from someone that was inside Yahoo before Google was founded.

The big lesson I take from below?  Realize that if you rely on a website to succeed, you are a software company.  If you don’t understand how to get the best developers and keep them, you will fail. 

In my world of creative agencies we spend a lot of time understanding how to get and maintain the best creative culture.  How long before we realize we’re in the software business as well?

What Happened to Yahoo

August 2010

When I went to work for Yahoo after they bought our startup in 1998, it felt like the center of the world. It was supposed to be the next big thing. It was supposed to be what Google turned out to be.

What went wrong? The problems that hosed Yahoo go back a long time, practically to the beginning of the company. They were already very visible when I got there in 1998. Yahoo had two problems Google didn’t: easy money, and ambivalence about being a technology company.

Money

The first time I met Jerry Yang, we thought we were meeting for different reasons. He thought we were meeting so he could check us out in person before buying us. I thought we were meeting so we could show him our new technology, Revenue Loop. It was a way of sorting shopping search results. Merchants bid a percentage of sales for traffic, but the results were sorted not by the bid but by the bid times the average amount a user would buy. It was like the algorithm Google uses now to sort ads, but this was in the spring of 1998, before Google was founded.

More

iris gets PocketTV on Channel 4

This is a great example of how branded content, well executed, can grow bigger than a marketing campaign and generate real revenue back to the brand and agency.  Great work iris!

Channel 4 to air Sony Ericsson mobile programme

Sony Ericsson’s mobile music and entertainment programme, ‘Pocket TV’, is to air for the first time on Channel 4.

Pocket TV: Sony Ericsson mobile programme to air on Channel 4

Pocket TV: Sony Ericsson mobile programme to air on Channel 4

Channel 4 has acquired the rights to the show, which has been a hit online and on mobile platforms, attracting 8.4 million views across YouTube, PS3/VidZone and MSN during series two.

The show, developed by Iris as branded content for Sony Ericsson, was originally created for the mobile platform and hosted a number of four- to six-minute interviews and live music tracks from artists including Ellie Goulding, Chipmunk and Sean Kingston.

A TV version will now be aired on Channel 4’s T4 and 4Music slots from 4 August.

The programme will include 11-minute shows featuring three videos each. The programme’s dedicated YouTube channel will run until the end of December.

Shaun McIlrath, executive creative director of Iris, said: “This is a great example of a marketing asset generating a value of its own because of the audience it has created. ‘Pocket TV’ has become quite a phenomenon”.

This article was first published on campaignlive.co.uk

Case Study: Digital Winning Big Brand Awareness

Today as ever brand marketers are wrestling with how much of their media spend to put online and are looking for case studies that allow them to “trust digital media” the way they do traditional media.  All of the unique visitor metrics and total impressions numbers aside, there remains a confidence gap until big brands start to circulate big cases where digital has delivered big results.

Now they are starting to come in like this one from Ford published in the WARC News Email:

In April, Ford, the automaker, asked 100 influential US bloggers to test drive its new Fiesta for a period of six months, and regularly post their opinions of the car on portals like Facebook and Twitter.

By October, it estimated that the resulting material had received 4.3 million hits on YouTube and 3 million comments on Twitter, while 540,000 people had viewed photos hosted on Flickr.

According to Jim Farley, Ford’s group vice president of global marketing, recognition rates of the Fiesta have grown rapidly, despite the fact it won’t be available until mid-2010.

“If you would have told me that we would have 100 vehicles in the US … and we would have 60% brand awareness in the segment, I would have said there is no possible way,” he said.

“To get 60% awareness in traditional media, it costs somewhere north of $50 million (€33.6m; £29.9m),” continued Farley, who added that the web is now a viable, and more low-cost, alternative to these channels.

“Online has become mass media. A Yahoo or Google page takeover actually gets more eyeballs than a network TV commercial now. That hasn’t happened before.”

In April, Ford, the automaker, asked 100 influential US bloggers to test drive its new Fiesta for a period of six months, and regularly post their opinions of the car on portals like Facebook and Twitter.

By October, it estimated that the resulting material had received 4.3 million hits on YouTube and 3 million comments on Twitter, while 540,000 people had viewed photos hosted on Flickr.

According to Jim Farley, Ford’s group vice president of global marketing, recognition rates of the Fiesta have grown rapidly, despite the fact it won’t be available until mid-2010.

“If you would have told me that we would have 100 vehicles in the US … and we would have 60% brand awareness in the segment, I would have said there is no possible way,” he said.

“To get 60% awareness in traditional media, it costs somewhere north of $50 million (€33.6m; £29.9m),” continued Farley, who added that the web is now a viable, and more low-cost, alternative to these channels.

“Online has become mass media. A Yahoo or Google page takeover actually gets more eyeballs than a network TV commercial now. That hasn’t happened before.”