Time to talk about your plumbing

Steel WorkerCouple weeks ago I attended the Market Marketing Nation Summit and got to revisit how the amazing tribe of demand gen fanatics is going to take over the world.  If direct marketers ever felt email took away the creativity of rolling 0ut an amazing dimensional DM pack with a maltese cross insert, I hope they have lost their spirit.  What is coming next will require a lot of creativity as well as great strategy and understanding of data.

The argument for the CMO and CEO is simple:  You know your customer experience is critical to your success and you believe your marketing is an important part of the brand experience.  Since media has fragmented your anthem TV spot doesn’t define your brand experience, it is every e-mail, banner, sponsored Facebook post and website visit.  You have to make them relevant or your competitors will and your customers will notice.

And of course you can’t manage that without software so it is time to talk about your plumbing, or the engine that powers the front-line of your brand experience.

https://www.mirumagency.com/san-diego/blog/can-marketing-automation-drive-customer-experience-marketo-takes-stand

Horizontality Extends to Practices – WPP Adobe Alliance

Gears working togetherInteresting to see a new corollary to the client Team approach, it is WPP product Alliance.  Supply-side meets Demand-side.  Since we truly can create teams across agencies when clients need them, so why not package them up that way?

 

WPP, the world’s largest communications services group, today announced the expansion of its strategic partnership with Adobe, the global leader in digital marketing software, to provide marketing solutions to clients through a coalition of specialist WPP agencies called the WPP-Adobe Alliance.

The WPP-Adobe Alliance brings together and makes available to clients Adobe Marketing Cloud capabilities across six WPP agencies and more than 1,000 experts in over 20 locations.

Combining the breadth of WPP’s digital agency network with the depth of its individual companies’ expertise, it also leverages the Group’s access (unique amongst its competitor set) to proprietary data through its data investment management business.

The launching members of the WPP-Adobe Alliance include Acceleration, Cognifide, KBM Group, Mirum, VML and Wunderman. Among these agencies are some of Adobe’s earliest partners, and all have extensive experience of successful Adobe Marketing Cloud implementations for WPP’s top global clients.

As an Adobe Premier Partner, WPP has committed to developing the skills required to design, develop, sell, deploy and operate solutions at a high level of expertise using Adobe technology throughout its network of companies.

WPP agencies hold certifications across the Adobe product portfolio. Wunderman, for example, was the first global Adobe partner to become a Specialized Partner for Adobe Campaign in both North America and EMEA. Cognifide has delivered expertise in Adobe Experience Manager for more than 10 years. Mirum Asia was named Adobe’s Digital Marketing Partner of the Year for three years in a row.

The WPP-Adobe Alliance is headed by Vice President of Strategic Partnerships, Kelly Ann Bauer. It is part of WPP’s Technology Partnership Program, an initiative led by Chief Digital Officer Scott Spirit to coordinate and promote the Group’s relationships with key providers of marketing technology services.

Sir Martin Sorrell, CEO of WPP, said: “The joint Adobe-WPP proposition is a very powerful one: Adobe’s leading marketing technology solutions alongside WPP’s unique ability to leverage the collective capabilities of our agencies, and our proprietary data, for the benefit of our global client base.

“The WPP-Adobe Alliance extends our combined offering beyond the footprint of a single WPP company through the creation of bespoke teams, enabling clients to respond more strategically and more efficiently to their biggest marketing challenges.”

“Through the WPP-Adobe Alliance, WPP clients can now yield the greatest return from their Adobe Marketing Cloud investments,” said Shantanu Narayen, president and CEO of Adobe. “We are excited about taking our successful digital marketing partnership with WPP to another level.”

Further information
Kelly Ann Bauer, WPP: kelly.bauer@wpp.com ; +1 646 339 1056

About Adobe Marketing Cloud
Adobe Marketing Cloud empowers companies to use big data to effectively reach and engage customers and prospects with highly personalized marketing content across devices and digital touch points. Eight tightly integrated Solutions offer marketers a complete set of marketing technologies that focus on analytics, web and app experience management, testing and targeting, advertising, video, audience management, social engagement and campaign orchestration. The tie-in with Adobe Creative Cloud makes it easy to quickly activate creative assets across all marketing channels. Thousands of brands worldwide including two thirds of Fortune 50 companies rely on Adobe Marketing Cloud.

About WPP
WPP is the world’s largest communications services group, with billings of nearly US$76 billion and revenues of nearly US$19 billion. Through its operating companies, the Group provides a comprehensive range of advertising and marketing services including advertising & media investment management; data investment management; public relations & public affairs; branding & identity; healthcare communications; direct, digital, promotion & relationship marketing; and specialist communications. The company employs over 188,000 people (including associates and investments) in more than 3,000 offices across 112 countries.

WPP was named Holding Company of the Year at the 2015 Cannes Lions International Festival of Creativity for the fifth year running. WPP was also named, for the fourth consecutive year, the World’s Most Effective Holding Company in the 2015 Effies, which recognise the effectiveness of marketing communications.

Catharine Taylor – Social Media Insider’s last column

Wow, The Social Media Insider retires!  It is hard to believe we worked together in 1999 at Organic but I remember it.

This column does a great job of putting all of that time in perspective.  Incredible to think that in just 2008 MySpace was still the largest social network….

Congratulations on 6 years of a great column!

 

 

The Social Media Insider Says Goodbye

Let’s put it right out there: After close to eight years and almost 400 columns, the Social Media Insider is calling it quits, at least for now. Wow, seeing that in writing seems strange. But, as practically anyone alive knows, every now and then it’s time to shake things up, and now is that time for me.Even though I’ve been preparing to write this last column for about a month, what to do with it has been a head-scratcher. So this morning, I did what many a tapped-out columnist, at a loss for more words, would do: I went back to the beginning, my very first Social Media Insider column, written on Feb. 20, 2008.

To put that time in perspective, MySpace was still the biggest social network, though clearly waning, Facebook was still the young upstart with 100 million users; today it has about 1.4 billion. Twitter was just under two years old, with about one million users; today the company reports 284 million monthly active users. Instagram? It would be more than two years until its first photo was uploaded, by co-founder Kevin Systrom.

More –

http://www.mediapost.com/publications/article/241443/the-social-media-insider-says-goodbye.html

Great Concise Global Digital Strategy

I’m going to blog this just so I don’t forget it.

 

Commentary

Developing a global digital strategy

How does a global company take advantage of digital technology? Johnson & Johnson’s vice president of digital strategy, Gail Horwood, explains.

October 2014 | byGail Horwood

I joined J&J Consumer Companies about four years ago to start its Digital Center of Excellence. Our role initially was to build capabilities and develop strategy that served multiple brands in multiple regions, so I did a landscape overview to help develop the approach. What I saw was that we had hundreds of different websites and digital platforms that we were operating upon globally. If you want to get a message across globally on your owned assets, you need to do that in the same way across the world.

Video

GailHorwood

Addressing the talent challenge

Johnson & Johnson’s vice president of digital strategy, Gail Horwood, discusses the importance of talent development and the role of the specialist.

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So we made a strategic decision to agree to build certain types of things, with a website on a shared platform at the center. We work both internally and with external vendors globally to build that and we love the open-source model. As we develop modules that suit our businesses, they can be shared, and it’s very exciting for our internal developers because it’s a new way of working.

In the past, the model might have been that our biggest brands had the most budget and developed the most robust platforms. And smaller brands had less robust digital footprints because they had to build that on their own power. Yet when you share a platform, any brand small or large can benefit from improvements. What this has enabled us to do is to bring the same power that one of our biggest, most iconic brands has to one small brand in a very particular region or market. And that, of course, enables us to innovate very quickly and iterate.

J&J has historically been very decentralized. One of the things I was able to do in the consumer sector was bring all that work together. The more we bring our cross-functional partners and projects together, the more we’ll make true impact for the business. It’s great to execute on a regional and local basis—and it’s really at the heart of our business strategy—but I believe digital brings opportunities to streamline and leverage certain capabilities that are really common across the businesses.

Real-time marketing

Social media is an example of something that truly requires a global and local strategy, because social makes any communication global. Setting a global communication strategy requires some pretty foundational things: content management, digital asset management, new production models that help us create and then leverage and syndicate content globally.

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The digital business model 

The digital business model

Horwood explains how to embed strategy into a business.

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For example, we recently participated in a real-time social-media campaign for the 2014 FIFA World Cup for our Listerine consumer brand. For the first time ever, J&J built two newsrooms, and we responded to action in the matches in real-time with brand messaging. We had to set up the appropriate processes, governance, a risk matrix, channels, and work very closely with our cross-functional team, as well as with regulatory compliance, legal, and marketing.

And you see the results of your work immediately and how consumers respond to it. We’ve had some great success with that. But the real lesson is that real-time marketing is as much about the preplanning and the preparation as it is about enabling people to act in real time.

In big companies like ours, creating a TV spot or a few pieces of copy a year would be quite typical. When you’re developing real-time social-media campaigns, you might have 200 pieces of copy in a month. Taking advantage of that required a new business model, a new way of thinking about it. It also required thinking about tolerance and risk. Tolerance is about asking, “What is a reasonable threshold for when we need to take action?” when something unexpected happens. It gave us the confidence to say, “You know what? We knew something like that could happen. It did, and we’ve already decided how we’re going to manage against that.”

I think it’s very important that social media be managed, at least in part, internally in an organization. As strong as our agency partners are, and they’ve been terrific creative partners, nobody knows our business and our business requirements as well as we do.

Serving consumers better

Evolving our model has been a learning journey. The challenge for us is not that the model is wrong; it’s that the landscape has changed. The model doesn’t fit the new landscape, so we’ve had a lot of success through these active learning projects.

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Driving results 

Driving results

Horwood answers the question she hears the most: “What is the ROI of digital?”

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Understanding the consumer journey and what we’re building for whom and when is very important. So I’ve set up a group that has product-development expertise. They translate business requirements into technical specifications. They maintain the responsibility for not just building and overseeing the build of digital products, but also ensuring that they’re measured and optimized. We treat them as platforms rather than projects.

A big shift in our organization has been to manage those over time and to iterate and build upon them as opposed to consider them a discrete project that had a beginning, a middle, and an end. When you put an app into the app store, you’re potentially finished with it, but the consumer is expecting updates, improvements, messaging. And that’s something that we’ve built into our organization that didn’t necessarily exist in our former model.

The other thing we’ve done is develop benchmarks. The number one question I’m asked by our business leaders is, “What is the ROI of digital?” If you’re developing across multiple platforms and multiple regions, the way you’re looking at the world and consumer behavior is very different. So what digital analytics and a standardized approach—rather than a custom and bespoke approach market by market—has brought us is true consumer insights. And we’re able to watch trends develop in consumer behaviors, see them change and develop.

We started very much as a strategy organization and we built common platforms that serve multiple brands in multiple regions. That didn’t mean anyone used them. So a lot of what we’ve been doing is around training, talent development, identifying talent that can staff these organizations, so we can really take what we’ve built and truly embed it in the business and in business practice. We’re trying to teach our businesses to leverage these new insights in ways that they hadn’t thought of.

About the authors

Gail Horwood has been the vice president of worldwide digital strategy at Johnson & Johnson since September 2010. This essay is an edited transcript of an interview conducted by McKinsey Publishing’s Simon London.

Kit Kat Social – The biggest real-time marketing hit for us yet

Hard to believe it was over 2 years ago that we pitched the KITKAT Global Social work and everything that has followed.
From “Break from Gravity” to “Android KitKat” to this piece here.  Really shows what having the right team and the right approach can do with the growth of social networks.

Two days after KitKat jumped into chatter around Apple’s #bendgate on Twitter with a cleverly-composed tweet, the candy brand’s post has now eclipsed Oreo’s real-time marketing reign.

Toward the end of the day Wednesday, chatter on Twitter started picking up around the news that Apple’s iPhone 6 was bending in people’s pockets, with the #bendgate hashtag.

According to sources, KitKat then decided that it needed to get in on #bendgate because of the alignment with its “Have a break, have a KitKat” slogan. Within 30 minutes, sources said, the brand whipped up an image of a candy bar snapped into a 45-degree angle with a piece of pithy copy and sent out the tweet.

http://www.adweek.com/news/advertising-branding/how-kitkats-awesome-bendgate-tweet-came-together-30-minutes-160414 

Another Day, Another Panel – ClickZ Keynote – Wednesday

As much fun as it is to talk about moving big brnad dollars to digital channels, I think the real proof is when we do it.  There has been great examples on Macy’szyrtec and J&J’s Zyrtec but we still don’t have the big digital campaign that goes into the minds of a mass audience like “Mean Joe Green”.  Or “15 minutes can save you 15%.”

YouTube creates the memes and everyone has heard of Gagnam Style but this is a cultural entertainment piece, not a brand promotion.  Many even saw the Jean-Claude Van Damme truck split but that is basically a 60 second spot.  It doesn’t use the power of the computer or the network at all aside for delivery.

So we use Fetchback to have Backcountry.com banners chase you around the internet, but no one can come up with a brand story that takes advantage of this technology?  The prize is big.

 

4:30p-5:30p
Afternoon Keynote

Digital Innovation Insights Driving Big Brand Awareness

A rare look at how the world’s leading agencies are making digital innovation the next creative breakthroughs for the brands we all admire most.

In this session you hear from the heads of digital at the most admired and creative agencies on the planet. This bare bones frank conversation about what drove success and even more importantly, how to avoid failed thinking will not only illuminate the agency folk in the room, but will inspire all of us brand and small business marketers to think outside the box and really drive big market share gains through Digital, Social and Mobile Marketing breakthrough ideas.

  • Moderator:
    Aaron Kahlow, CEO & Founder, Online Marketing Institute
  • Panelists:
    John Baker, President, JWT
    Jordan Bitterman, Chief Strategy Officer, North America, Mindshare
    John Burke, VP, Digital Strategist, Entrée Health LLC, A company of The CDM Group
    Jon Wegman, VP Planning and Strategy, Performics

Adobe Summit: Building Brands: 150 years meeting CMOs, and not just for lunch

Just completed a panel moderating how to sell in new platforms and analytics packages to big marketing organizations.  Great session, good comments and questions from the audience.

Of course the biggest question?  When do we stop putting all of our money into traditional TV, print and outdoor.  Should have seen that one coming earlier!

 

JWT works with big brands and knows how to talk to CMOs. Do you want to connect your work to the brand strategy?  Want to learn how to influence business strategy?  Make sure you are heard at the top of the organization?  Our roundtable discussion brings together a few clients and a big brand advertiser from JWT, a technical platform builder from XM Asia, and a global analytics expert from Digitaria to answer a simple question:  We all want the CMO and CEO’s ear, how do we make sure we talk their language?

Specifically we’ll look at:

  • From pixels to business strategy—How a replatforming brief can drive a completely new approach to doing business.
  • Delivering the news—How to present the campaign results so all of the agencies listen.
  • Signal from noise – How the brand team talks strategy and why the CMO spends so much time listening to them.

This session is relevant to all digital marketers that want to drive strategy with the c-suite.

  • John Baker – Global Digital Strategy Team, JWT
  • Vince Lui – Regional Director, XM Consulting
  • Mia Umanos – Director of Analytics, Digitaria
  • David McBride – Sr Director Analytics, American Eagle Outfitter

Did Mobile Video Kill the TV Star? MWC 2014 Panel

Had the opportunity to speak at the Mobile Media Summit at Mobile World Congress event in Barcelona.  It was a fun panel with some good questions from the audience.  I wrote up a more glib review of it for JWT on our blog, below.

Did Mobile Video Kill the TV Star?

March 3, 2014 • by 

mobile_world_congress_2014

John Baker has worked in interactive marketing for almost 20 years. He is now the President of dotJWT, a global program dedicated to driving digital growth for companies acquired under the JWT umbrella.

Earlier this week I was asked to speak on a Mobile Media Summit panel at the Mobile World Congress in Barcelona.

The subject was Did Mobile Video Kill the TV Star?

No question the Buggles had it right: Video Killed the Radio Star. When television emerged as the dominant broadcast medium in the 1950s,the radio guys were fighting with one arm tied behind their back.You need a hell of a voice to enrapture people when they are being seduced by super charismatic people working full screen video with bright smiles and perfectly timed hair flicks.

But mobile video? With its smaller screen and distracted audience? Can mobile video take down the Kardashians, Jeremy Clarkson and Yang Mi?

 – See more at: JWT.com/blog

Speaking in Barcelona – Did Mobile Video Kill the TV Star?

Did or will?  Or we will see.

Mobile Media Summit @Mobile World Congress on Tuesday, February 25th held at Fira Montjuic – Avinguda Reina Maria Christina. 08004 Barcelona, Spain.

Your panel: “Did Mobile Video Kill the TV Star?” begins at 2:25PM. Please be on site at least 1 hour prior. 

Your moderator is Ali Rana – Group SVP Head Scientist Emerging Media, Millward Brown Digital. He will set up an intro call, which I’m happy to attend (make sure you send me any dial-in information necessary).  

Also on your panel:  

·       Darin Brown – President – Europe, Crispin Porter + Bogusky

·       John Baker – President, dotJWT 

·       Doug Livingston – Global Chief Digital Officer, mcgarrybowen

 

·       Zaid Al-Zaidy – Chief Executive Officer, McCann London

Future of Advertising Post on JWT Blog

This piece was just published on the JWT Blog.  It is unfair to say Google has pulled creativity out of the busienss because their Art, Copy, Code program and Project Re:Brief are both excellent examples of adding creativity to the industry.  That said, ad words?  Much harder to defend in terms of creativity.

 


Is This the Future of Online Advertising?

July 18, 2013 • by  

There are three platforms that dominate the time people spend online and their names are no surprise – Google, Facebook and Twitter. They have become the backbone of the digital experience and smart brands go where their audience is – so is this the future of advertising?

Dry. That is the best word to describe the experience users have when they see the ads above. These ads are all structured and template-driven. Yes, there is space for a great headline and brands can do something with their thumbnails, but there are no big full-bleed images, no snippets of killer video, no clever interactive overlays.

The “ads” have this form because all three companies have shifted their focus to content distribution and lightweight publishing.

Unfortunately this means the ad unit is a tiny chunk of content with about as much heart pounding, emotion-inducing impact as a postage stamp.

– See more at: http://www.jwt.com/blog/dotjwt/is-this-the-future-of-online-advertising/#sthash.x7EJMph8.dpuf